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Imagination Centre Reviews: @Marvel's Iron Man, Uncanny Avengers, Uncanny X-Men @JohnMcCubbin3


Here are today's "Guest Reviews" by John McCubbin from Imagination Centre. Included are Marvel's; Iron Man #10, Uncanny Avengers #8AU, and Uncanny X-Men #6. I have also added my rating after each review. If you have any questions about my rating or want to discuss anything just leave me a comment.


See the Review Rating Overview page for more information on how I rate each comic.


Iron Man #10 - The Secret Origin of Tony Stark, Part 1


Many years ago, Howard and Maria Stark had a baby. There's something you don't know.


Learn the truth about Las Vegas and Area 51 as the two great myths of Nevada collide.


Meanwhile, in a distant galaxy, Tony Stark screams!


The story that will shake Iron Man to his very core starts here!!!


Preview



Stark's Seven


I originally had high hopes for this series, but the first story, Believe was very poor, and I dropped the series. I have however decided to give this Secret Origins story a chance, and although the prelude wasn't brilliant, the story does have has potential.

Plot

After being immobilized by a mechanism called 451, Iron Man (Tony Stark) is forced to hear the story of how his father, Howard Stark, along with a group of friends went on a mission to save the unborn Tony.

Review

This wasn't a bad issue, and in fact is one of the better issues I've read in this series, but like all of Kieron Gillen's work on this series, it has it's flaws, and is far from brilliant. This issue was all over the place, and although there were good bit's, the start was a bit too rushed, which took away from it's tone, and pace. Gillen did however show some promise for the future of this storyline, as although it could still be a disaster, there are a lot of ways he can go which would make this a brilliant story. One of the main things I liked about Gillen's writing in this issue was that he stepped back on the humor, as although this hasn't been a humor based comic, there have been some references, and jokes that have just felt forced, so it was nice that this issue didn't have any of that. It also allowed for Gillen to add more emotion to the issue which was nice, as with the story centering around a father trying to save his unborn child, it was bound to have a lot of emotion in it, and although GIllen could have handled it better, he did do a decent job of it. Gillen also did a half decent job of making this issue dramatic at times, as although the pace at the start was all over the place, the rest of the issue was at times very dramatic, and exciting, and hopefully Gillen will manage to turn this into a good story.

The art from Dale Eaglesham was once again brilliant, and I'm very happy that he's doing the art on this story. As I've said in my previous reviews, the previous artist Greg Land's art wasn't terrible, and there were things I liked about it, but there are things that I hate about his art (way he draws women, and smiles mainly). Eaglesham's art, although not quite as nice looking is however much more consistent, which makes it much more appealing than Land's. The detail in Eaglesham's art is also something that put's his above Land's, as although Land's has some decent detail, it's not detailed to the level of Eaglesham's, which isn't far of perfect. The thing about Eaglesham's art that I loved the most however had to be the way he drew both the past, and the present, as although there wasn't a great deal of difference between the two, they had very different tone's, showing the time periods that they were in, which was perfect. I also loved the Eaglesham's layouts, and especially in the past sequences, as they were very unique, and made the story that much more dynamic. Eaglesham also drew both the character's, and the facial expressions perfectly as well, as you could really see what they were feeling by their expressions.

Read the rest of John McCubin's Review on Imagination Centre

My Rating


Cover & Solicit - 2/5
Art, Colors & Inking - 4/5
Layout & Flow - 2/5
Story - 4/5
Verdict - 3.4 - 
(Buy Iron Man #10)


Uncanny Avengers #8AU


Kang and the The Apocalypse Twins enter the Age of Ultron, but what do they want?


Havok and Rogue, leaders of the Morlocks, must fight to save the man who condemned their people!


What secret will Rogue unearth about the Twins hidden past?

Preview







Raising the Apocalypse


This has been a fabulous series, and although it didn't have the best start, it has recently became phenomenal, and my favorite Marvel NOW! series. At the same time however the Age of Ultron crossover has been very disappointing, and although there have been a couple of interesting tie-ins, they have also been generally poor, but if there's a series that can make Age of Ultron worthwhile it's this one.

Plot

Kang takes the Apocalypse Twins, Uriel, and Eimin to this alternative world that has been caused through the death of Hank Pym, teaching them that a warrior faces their opponent head on, tasking them with killing Colonel America.

Review

This was an amazing issue, and both a brilliant back story, as well as a fabulous tie-in to a disappointing crossover. As I said in my introduction, there have been a couple of tie-in's to Age of Ultron that have been entertaining, but nothing quite as good as this issue, which in a way makes Age of Ultron slightly worthwhile. Both Rick Remender, and Gerry Duggan did an excellent job in showing the development of the Apocalypse Twins prior to the main story, and how they became the killers they are. Now I don't really know how much influence Duggan had in this issue, as co-writing is still sometimes a bit of a mystery to me (with who actually did what), but Remmender has used this opportunity to delve deeper into the past of his storyline, without making it an essential issue to the story, and whatever involvement Duggan had didn't hurt the story. Another thing I loved about the writing was the way it played into the crossover, and this new universe, and to be honest if it came earlier in the crossover, it wouldn't have been as good, and would have felt slightly unnecessary. I also loved that despite this, Remender, and Duggan managed to involve as many members of the Avengers Unity Squad (as they are in this universe) as they could, and it really made the issue feel like it's part of the series, whilst being it's own stand alone story, that also fits into the main story.

The art in this issue was from Adam Kubert, and although his art is nothing compared to any of the artists that have featured on this series so far (John Cassaday, Olivier Coipel, and Daniel Acuña), it suited this issue, and this setting. I've enjoyed Kuberts art in the past, especially on Ultimate X-Men so it was nice to see him feature on this series, and even though his art isn't as visually stunning as the other artists I mentioned, the detail he produced in this issue was brilliant, and it was clear that he made a big effort. I also really loved how Kubert handled most of the character's, especially the changed state of the character's in this new universe. I was however not very fond of how Kubert drew Kang, as his face was a little too square, and overall not the awe-inspiring character that I love to see in comics. Kubert did however make up for this in many ways, as the detail in the settings was also amazing, and the fight sequences were just phenomenal, being very vivid, and exciting, whilst also adding more drama, and suspense, which was truly outstanding. The cover from Jim Cheung was also phenomenal, and the amazing way he drew Kang, reminded me of his brilliant artwork during Young Avengers, and he also drew the Apocalypse Twins perfectly.

Read the rest of John McCubin's Review on Imagination Centre

My Rating



Cover & Solicit - 4/5
Art, Colors & Inking - 4/5
Layout & Flow - 5/5
Story - 5/5

Verdict - 4.6 - (Buy Uncanny Avengers #8AU)


Uncanny X-Men #6


The Uncanny X-Men face evil sorcerer DORMAMMU! Don't miss this new take on the evil sorcerer demon courtesy of Bendis and Irving.

Discover the secrets Magik has been hiding since the Phoenix Force left her in AVENGERS VS. X-MEN.

Preview



The X-Men Go to Hell... Kinda


I originally wasn't going to get this series, hence the reason I'm reviewing it so late. I did however decide to get it as it had decent reviews, but the main reason was the upcoming Battle of the Atom crossover which features this.

Plot

The X-Men have been dragged to Limbo (Hell) by the demonic like Dormammu, and have to find a way out. Also a new mutant appears who has the ability to will things into action.

Review

After an amazing last issue, Brian Michael Bendis continues to amaze, continuing the story he started last issue perfectly, and keeping a steady, and exciting pace. This issue started a bit slower than last issue, but once it returned to the X-Men in Limbo it soon picked up pace again. This is the type of story that Bendis is best at writing, as he always likes to play with magic in his writing, with his second New Avengers series mainly focusing on magic, and he once again did a brilliant job of introducing magic to this series. What I preferred about this time though was that it was a much different type of magic, not having any spells or incantations, simply having a magic based connection, and magic based character's. Bendis also did an amazing job of adding both drama, and suspense to this issue, as although it's only the second part of a three part story, it didn't dive too much into action, but at the same time, didn't feel like a drag. Bendis also once again did a fabulous job with the dialogue, as you could really see what the character's were thinking, and feeling through this, and it added both drama, and also at certain times humor, making the issue much more dynamic. There was also a lot of emotion shown in this issue, and Bendis handled it perfectly, making it work to the advantage of the story.

Frazer Irving once again did an outstanding job on the artwork in this issue, and I'm more than ecstatic that he's working on this story. His style simply suits the subject matter, and although there are many artists I prefer overall compared to Irving, I doubt there's anyone that could top him with this type of story. The detail in Irving's art is simply amazing, as no matter what he's drawing, whether a simple sequence involving S.H.I.E.L.D., or an extravagant sequence in Limbo, it always amazes, and the detail is never far of perfection. Talking about Limbo, that was probably the best thing about Irving's art, and the real reason that he was needed for this story. It was simply phenomenal, with everything from the scenery, to Dormammu, to the fiery setting looked beautiful, and was nothing short of awe-inspiring. The emotions that Irving showed through the character's facial expressions was also brilliant, as although it had very minor flaws, you could really tell what the character's were feeling. Now there was one thing that I didn't like about Irving's art, and that was the way he drew both Emma Frost, and the Stepford Cuckoos in diamond form, as although it wasn't terrible, it just felt unrealistic, and not as organic as it should look. Irving did however make up for this as his inking, and coloring was terrific, and although it may have been his coloring that hurt the diamond form look, the rest of his coloring was spot on, giving a very vibrant, and dynamic look to the issue.

Read the rest of John McCubin's Review on Imagination Centre


My Rating


Cover & Solicit - 4/5
Art, Colors & Inking - 3/5
Layout & Flow - 5/5
Story - 5/5
Verdict - 4.3
 - (Buy Uncanny X-Men #6)

Purchase Marvel Comics
John McCubbin is a blogger at http://imaginationcentre.blogspot.co.uk/ and a comic book reviewer at Comic Vine. The use of this review has been authorized by the original author.

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